Conclusive Combos on Mayweather, Pacquiao, Mosley, Cintron, Donaire, Ortiz, Campbell, Khan, Malignaggi, Ring's Top 10 Boxing and More!
By JD Camacho (May 12, 2010) Doghouse Boxing  
In the wake of Mayweather-Mosley, a lot has happened in Boxing, so let’s work our way backwards to the initial blow with another round of conclusive blows in combination:

Amir Khan and Paulie Malignaggi should answer one of the two remaining questions about the quick-fisted Khan. Malignaggi has only really lost to two world-class fighters who simply overpowered him. Add to that, his game plan against Ricky Hatton was not the wisest. Also note that Miguel Cotto and Hatton have both demonstrated decent to very good power at junior welterweight, and neither really hurt Malignaggi on more than a handful of occasions. If Khan can outbox Malignaggi, he’ll have outboxed a tough, speedy fighter who hadn’t been outboxed before. It’ll answer how good Khan’s skills really are. Now, Malignaggi’s infant-nudge punches won’t answer the real pressing question about Khan, but that can wait. For now…

Another pair of question marks dot the main undercard this Saturday. Some wonder how Victor Ortiz will react if things don’t go his way again. Others ask if Nate Campbell has any tricks still floating around his boxing bag – and whether he can even use them anymore. What do we know? We know that Ortiz is much younger, we know Ortiz can fight a bit, and we can assume that a one-time super featherweight like Campbell doesn’t hit like Marcos Maidana. What does all that mean? I guess we’ll find out…

I understand that some fans loathe pound-for-pound lists, but I have to point this out: RING Magazine’s newest pound-for-pound list is the oddest one I’ve seen in quite awhile. The top two are obvious, but an absolute mess follows. Juan Manuel Marquez and Shane Mosley are mysteries after their respective beatings from Floyd Mayweather. Nonito Donaire has done next to nothing since knocking out Vic Darchinyan almost three years ago. Sure, he’s fought some contenders, but that alone doesn’t mean he should be ranked so high. Compare his recent body of work with that of undefeated light heavyweight titleholder Chad Dawson. In that same time span since Darchinyan, Dawson has defeated both of his top contenders twice. On top of that, Dawson’s win over now-heavyweight and once-beaten Tomasz Adamek appreciates the more Adamek keeps winning. Donaire benefits from others once above him losing – a common problem with pound-for-pound lists. Still, I say they scrap this list and start anew…

Kermit Cintron’s behavior, once again, borders on bizarre. I don’t know who to believe following his debacle with Paul Williams. Cintron says he was advised not to continue. The doctor says that Cintron himself chose not to continue. I can’t think of a legitimate reason why Cintron would want to throw the fight, though. He wasn’t getting beat up. I even thought Cintron was winning, but other writers are right: a little over three rounds is not enough to let us know who the better man is. It’s too bad, too, because before the – ahem – dive, a fight was breaking out…

For everyone’s sake, high-powered promoters Bob Arum and Richard Schaefer should just stop talking to the media altogether and start talking to each other…

So Lennox Lewis has been let go by HBO? “Absolutely,” you say? Well, bring on the replacement. Just not Freddie Roach. Unlike retired fighters, Roach is still one of the best there is at his day-job…

I tell you what: Timothy Bradley-Devon Alexander is one of the best match-ups that can be made in the sport. It might not be ready just yet, though – not for monetary reasons (though, of course, it could be bigger than it is), but for competitive reasons. I feel Bradley is more the finished article than Alexander, and as such I hope Alexander gets just a little bit more seasoning before he steps in with his undefeated counterpart…

So what did the Floyd Mayweather-Shane Mosley spectacle prove? If the 1.4 million pay-per-view buys mean anything, it proves Mayweather can draw one hell of a televised audience. If the crowd’s reaction during the second round means anything, it proves that what people really want to see is Mayweather threatened. If the one-sided remainder of the fight after the second means anything, it proves that Mayweather can adjust, can adapt, and can walk forward in dominant fashion just as he can fight backward the same. Against Carlos Baldomir, Mayweather circled away and picked and poked the slow champion, keeping Baldomir to a mere 79 blows. In rounds three through twelve in Mosley’s fight against Mayweather, the much-faster-than-Baldomir Mosley only landed 63 punches – this, while Mayweather was backing Mosley up. The man is a defensive savant, in any direction or dimension…

It worth noting, though, that Floyd Mayweather can never surpass Sugar Ray Robinson on the mythical all-time scale, not even if he manages to embarrass the fire-breathing Manny Pacquiao. And I don’t even care much about Robinson’s activity level, nor do I forget that Robinson lost the weight battle when he became dehydrated against Joey Maxim. What Robinson did do was fight (and win) long after he was supposed to do so. The scope of Robinson’s resume is akin to stacking the ageless Bernard Hopkins’ ledger on top of the unbeaten Mayweather’s, and then calling it a career…

Comments/disputes/questions?
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JD at: jdcamachorj@gmail.com

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